Past Fellows

Morgan Roche

University of Tennessee (Tenn.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2016): Messy Breakups of the Plant and Fungal World: Mutualism Disruption and Plant Reproductive Allocation Shifts Caused by Allelopatheic Invaders Could be a Mechanism of Native Biodiversity Decline

Normally when we think about species interacting, animals come to mind. However, plants and fungi can interact too! I am interested in how the breakdown of the relationship between fungi in the soil and plant roots impacts the reproductive ability of native plants.

Research Advisor: Dr. Susan Kalisz, Professor and Head, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Past Fellows

Rebecca Dalton

Duke University (N.C.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2015 – ‘16): Assessing Mechanisms of Coexistence Between Two Spring Ephemerals Under a Changing Climate

My research examines the relationship between timing of life cycle events and the ability of two plant species to coexist. From 1978-1982 in Durham, N.C., two researchers studied the timing of flowering and pollinator community of two forest herbs, Claytonia virginica and Erythronium umbilicatum. This year, I am returning to their old field sites to study whether or not flowering time is earlier than it was in the past, and if C. virginica and E. umbilicatum compete for the same resources, such as light, nutrients and pollinators. In addition to studying how species coexist in N.C., I will be completing a similar study with closely related congeners, Claytonia lanceolata and Erythronium grandiflorum in Gunnison, Colo. With this information, I will be able to ask how climate change will affect species interactions across a broad geographic range.

Research advisor: Dr. William F. Morris, Professor, Biology Department, Trinity College of Arts & Sciences, Duke University

Past Fellows

Andrea Drager

Rice University (TX)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2015 – ‘16): Staying Connected: How Pollination Relates to Tree Density in the Afrotropics

The incredible diversity of trees in tropical forests around the world is possible due to the high number of locally rare species that exist at low densities and rely on animal pollinators to move their pollen to the flowers of other individuals. My research aims to understand how such species compete for pollinators and achieve reproduction by examining several aspects of these pollination interactions in a highly diverse African rainforest community.

Through a combination of observations, experiments and statistical modeling involving a hyperdiverse rainforest tree community, I will: 1) assess relationships between tree density and traits associated with pollinator attraction, 2) determine how tree density relates to specialization on pollinators or pollinator types, 3) examine how pollen limitation to seed set relates to tree density, specialization and floral traits, as well as how it may be influenced by the abundance of co-flowering neighbors, and 4) construct a network of heterospecific pollen receipt for species that share pollinators, in order to better understand pollen flow in the community, as potentially relating to floral abundance, reward, richness and density. Results will contribute to our conceptual understanding of biodiversity maintenance in species-rich ecosystems and will have important implications for their management, particularly in the face of global pollinator declines and increasing forest fragmentation and degradation.

Research advisor: Dr. Amy Dunham, Assistant Professor, Department of Biosciences, Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Rice University

Past Fellows

Ryan Unks

University of Georgia (Ga.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2015): Kenya – An interdisciplinary analysis of sustainable landscapes in Laikipia, Kenya

Conservation initiatives in East Africa frequently focus on wildlife mobility as a key adaptation to the high variability of rainfall found in semi-arid environments. However, despite large implications for sustainability due to the tight coupling of herder livelihoods and vegetation resources, the connection between recent changes in mobility of livestock herders and recent changes in savanna vegetation is rarely a focus of research. This proposed Ph.D. dissertation research will explore the relationships of changes in plant distributions and abundances as they relate to recent changes in herding practices, using a combination of satellite image analysis and ecological field work in Laikipia, Kenya. I also plan to explore herder’s understandings of landscape-level changes in plant diversity and abundance, as well as the drivers of these changes. This synthesis of ecological and anthropological methods has promise for leading to an improved understanding of how savanna ecosystems are changing and how these changes relate to local livelihoods. It is my hope that incorporating local understandings and ecological analysis can lead to better outcomes in conservation practice. Improved understanding of the drivers and implications of landscape change is a necessary foundation for determining appropriate policies for landscape-level conservation, vegetation restoration practices, and sustainable livelihoods. Using public outreach, I will solicit local community members to review my work and results, in hopes of connecting my research to the public to collaboratively explore the nuances of ecological and livelihood changes. The practical upshot of this dialogue will then be communicated to non-governmental conservation actors.

Research advisor: Dr. Elizabeth G. King, Assistant Professor, Odum School of Ecology, Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources, University of Georgia

Past Fellows

Chelsie Romulo

George Mason University (Va.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2014 – ‘16): Working to Conserve and Sustainably Manage the Ecologically, Culturally and Economically Important Palm Tree Mauritia flexuosa (Aguaje) in the Peruvian Amazon 

The aguaje market within the Peruvian Amazon has not been comprehensively evaluated for over 25 years, and there is no published research describing how aguaje distribution has changed over time. Using an interdisciplinary approach that couples interviews and socioeconomic data with remote sensing, I hope to understand how changes in the aguaje market have impacted aguaje distribution over time. The goal of this proposed project is to develop an understanding of the aguaje market and describe the environmental impacts of harvest as a first step toward achieving a sustainable regional management system for this important and unique ecosystem. Though aguaje could potentially be a sustainable non-timber forest product and long-term source of income for Amazonian communities, the current harvest strategy of cutting down female trees is both ecologically and economically unsustainable.

The long-term main objective of my dissertation research is the conservation and sustainable management of the aguaje palm through a regional adaptive planning effort.  No regional management plans for aguaje and its threatened ecosystem currently exist in the Peruvian Amazon, which is problematic given that current harvest methods and levels are both ecologically and economically unsustainable. This plan will take a multifaceted approach and collaborative planning that includes community engagement, economic incentives and education. The complementary goals of this project are to encourage a shift to more sustainable harvest methods and secure long-term economic opportunity for rural harvester communities that will have a significant impact in conservation of species and habitats. Our long term goals are to collaborate with all stakeholder groups to identify and establish effective incentives for sustainable harvest that incorporate an understanding of the socioeconomic impacts of policy on harvesters and Amazonian communities. Our findings will be disseminated to decision makers of the government, local community organizations where the research is taking place, and with publication in scholarly journals.

Research advisors: Dr. Michael Gilmore, assistant professor of life sciences/integrative studies, New Century College, George Mason University and Dr. Francisco Dallmeier, Director, Center for Conservation Education and Sustainability at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute

Past Fellows

Stephen J. Murphy

The Ohio State University (Oh.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2014 – ‘15): Pennsylvania – Forest landscape change in southwestern Pennsylvania

A common misconception is that forests are static entities, remaining relatively unchanged through time unless subjected to a severe disturbance such as fire or logging. In reality, forests are constantly changing as certain species increase in abundance, others decrease, and yet others remain stable over time. Taking this dynamic nature of forests into account when predicting how they will look in the future is extremely important, because changes in species composition can influence the types and values of services that these ecosystems provide. For example, changes could occur in the availability of suitable habitat for wildlife, the types of nutrient input from litter, or the types of timber that will be available for commercial purposes.

An existing series of forest plots established at Powdermill Nature Reserve offers a unique opportunity to study such changes in the forested landscape of southwestern Pennsylvania. I propose to resample a subset of these existing plots to determine how the number of species, the abundances of those species, and their overall sizes have changed over a period of six years. Because significant changes in other forests throughout the eastern United States have been documented previously, I expect that the forests of southwestern Pennsylvania will also present similar dynamism. Specifically, I expect to observe a decrease in drought-tolerant individuals and an increase in moisture-loving species. Also, because areas of the reserve are still recovering from past human land-use impacts, I expect to see an increase in the overall biomass of the forest.

Research advisor: Liza S. Comita, assistant professor, Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, The Ohio State University

Past Fellows

Jessica B. Turner

West Virginia University (W.Va.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2014 – ‘15): West Virginia – The root of sustainability: understanding and implementing medicinal plant conservation strategies in the face of land-use change in Appalachia

American ginseng is a valuable medicinal plant that is culturally important worldwide. Ginseng is harvested by people in Appalachia and sold on the international market. Through human activity, ginseng’s habitat is being reduced; much of this land-use change is due to surface mining. How land was used historically can influence how well a plant grows and reproduces. My research studies the relationship between ginseng and surface mining, both from the ecosystem and social science perspective. (1) Can ginseng and another medicinal plant, goldenseal, grow just as well on land that was previously surface-mined, as compared to forests with other types of land-use history? Through this reintroduction study, I will ascertain, according to how well these plants grow, if previously mined lands are lost as potential medicinal plant habitat or if people could grow medicinal plants on previously mined lands. (2) How do people in Appalachia view surface mining and ginseng conservation? Through surveys, I will learn if people in both the Appalachian and ginseng harvester communities prioritize the forest and practice conservation. I will also be able to assess if attitudes toward surface mining effects might be different if restoration of medicinal plants was possible. By researching how people think about ginseng and surface mining, I can develop environmental education based on the community’s perspective of ginseng conservation. Understanding the impacts of surface mining on the role of ginseng in the forests, as well as on the culture of Appalachia, will provide a basis for how people can conserve medicinal plants.

Research advisor: James B. McGraw, Ph.D., Eberly Professor of Biology, West Virginia University

Past Fellows

Aurelie Jacquet

Purdue University (Ind.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2014): Nepal and U.S. – Neuroprotective activities of Nepalese and Native American traditional medicines in Parkinson’s disease

The central hypothesis is that the plants used in Nepalese and Native American traditional medicines have a high potential to alleviate neuron death and changes in brain cells associated with Parkinson’s disease. We collected medicinal plants and are conducting controlled tests to determine the safety and therapeutic efficacy of the samples. We documented more than 300 uses overall, but we need to spend more time with the Lumbee people to provide a more complete overview of their medicine. Because herbal medicine is sacred and secret among people of the tribe, information about these practices is only shared after a trust relationship is established between the healer and the researcher.

Our research contributes to the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goal #1, “Eradicate poverty and hunger,” through the generation of knowledge that can initiate new discussions in the field of public health policy, and through the preservation of traditional practices.

Research advisor: Jean-Christophe Rochet, Ph.D., associate professor of medicinal chemistry and molecular pharmacology, Purdue University

Past Fellows

Anna Johnson

University of Maryland Baltimore County (Md.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2014): Maryland – Biodiversity in the city: the interactive effects of land-use legacies and environmental gradients on the diversity of fragmented urban plant communities

While most of the global human population lives in cities, our urban ecosystems remain one of the least studied environments from the perspective of ecological science. We rely on the plants that grow in cities to provide services to the human population, such as cooling and cleaning the air and making our neighborhoods more beautiful. We know relatively little, however, about what factors are most important for creating the patterns of urban plant diversity that we observe. This project explores how history of land-use in vacant lots affects the plants that grow there today and tests a restoration strategy for increasing urban plant diversity. I previously have conducted surveys of existing plant diversity in vacant lots in Baltimore, Md. I found that, in these vacant lots, there was more variation in plant diversity within areas that were remnant backyards than within the areas of the lots where buildings previously stood. I plan to expand these results to study whether the effects of different legacies of land-use on plant diversity change predictably over time, by collecting property records and reconstructing the history of when each house was abandoned and demolished. This will result in a description of what happens to abandoned urban land in the absence of human intervention. I will also collect data from a 2-year-long field experiment that increased the diversity of native wildflowers in “weedy” plant communities. I will use what is learned from this smaller experiment to guide a similar experimental restoration plan for entire vacant lots.

Research advisor: Christopher M. Swan, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Geography & Environmental Systems, University of Maryland Baltimore County

Past Fellows

Kelly Ksiazek

Northwestern University and the Chicago Botanic Garden (Ill.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2014): Illinois – The influence of seed and pollen movement on the diversity of green roof plant populations

The conversion of natural land to cities means that more plants and animals need to live alongside people. Special rooftop gardens, called green roofs, could include plant species that have lost their normal living spaces on the ground. If plants are able to live successfully on green roofs, they could provide resources like food and nesting materials to many insects and birds. However, green roofs, like other urban gardens, tend to be located far away from each other. Spaces between the roofs might not be good places for plants and animals to live, causing green roofs to function like isolated islands throughout a city. If plants on green roofs are not connected to other plant populations, inbreeding can occur between a few closely related individuals. Over time, this could mean that all individuals on a green roof were related and could share the same inability to respond to stressful situations like droughts.

If, however, green roofs received seeds and pollen from other locations, the plants could have a greater ability to adapt to changes in the environment. To date, little is known about how green roof plant populations are connected with plants in other habitats throughout cities. My research will determine which characteristics of plants allow them to get to new green roofs and will compare the movement of pollen on green roofs to a typical natural habitat. Results of this research will enable the creation of future green roofs designed to support diverse and resilient groups of plants.

Research advisor: Krissa Skogen, Ph.D., conservation scientist, Chicago Botanic Garden; adjunct professor, Northwestern University

George A. Meindl

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2012 – ‘13): Pennsylvania and California – Assessing the potential for cascading effects of heavy metal soil pollution: plants and pollinators

Human land use has resulted in toxic levels of heavy metal soil contamination. Phytoremediation has emerged as a low-cost means to clean contaminated soils. Plants are grown on metal-contaminated soil and then removed at the end of their life cycle, taking the soil metals with them. However, because many insects feed on plant tissue, local insect populations may be harmed if they feed on metal-rich plants. George’s research seeks to determine the potential risks phytoremediation poses to insects, particularly pollinators.

Research advisor: Tia-Lynn Ashman, Ph.D., professor and associate chair, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh

Anita Varghese

University of Hawaii (Hawaii)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2011 – ‘13): India – Community-based ecological monitoring and its implications for conservation in the Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve (India)

Collection of plant products is an important livelihood activity for communities in the tropics. The rising demand for herbal products puts plants under pressure, and often this pressure goes un-assessed. Traditional knowledge of the harvesters can complement scientific knowledge; together they can provide direct insight for better conserving ecologically and culturally important medicinal plants and their habitats.

Research advisor: Tamara Ticktin, Ph.D., associate professor of botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Samantha Davis

Wright State University (Ohio)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2011 – ‘12): Ohio – The direct and indirect effects of plant invasion on a rare woodland butterfly

The invasive plant garlic mustard has been contributing to the decline of the West Virginia White butterfly, a rare woodland butterfly. Sam’s research examines how garlic mustard kills wildflowers, why the Virginia White lays its eggs on garlic mustard, how well caterpillars survive when they are eating garlic mustard, and whether garlic mustard’s invasion is pushing the West Virginia White towards extinction.

Research advisor: Don Cipollini, Ph.D., professor, Department of Biological Sciences and director, Environmental Sciences Ph.D. program, Wright State University

Vandana Krishnamurthy

University of Hawaii (Hawaii)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2011 – ‘12): India – Ethnobotany, trade and population dynamics of the endemic Cycas species.

Cycas circinalis and Cycas indica are two important species for adivasi (indigenous) groups in the Western Ghats of India; due to trade pressure, these plants are decreasing in the wild. Vandana’s research examines traditional knowledge of C. circinalis and C. indica harvest, biological responses of the population to harvest pressures, and market uses that steer the extensive harvest of the species.

Research advisor: Tamara Ticktin, Ph.D., associate professor of botany, University of Hawaii at Manoa

Lisa Offringa

City University of New York (N.Y.) and the New York Botanical Garden

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2011 – ‘12): Thailand – Identifying plants used by traditional healers for treatment for dementia

The prevalence of dementia is increasing worldwide in both industrialized and developing nations. Lisa’s research examines Thai medicinal plants with the potential to slow the progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) to dementia and to treat the memory loss. By conducting interviews with traditional doctors in northern Thailand and performing chemical analyses, Lisa was able to pinpoint a plant with positive effects on memory and brain chemistry.

Research advisor: Michael J. Balick, Ph.D., New York Botanical Garden

Sushma Shrestha

Miami University (Ohio)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2010 – ‘12): Nepal – Integrating community forest ecological and ethnobotanical knowledge for biodiversity conservation

Sushma’s research investigates scientific-ecological and local ethnobotanical knowledge at the Manaslu Conservation Area of Nepal (MCA). Using global localism as a research approach, she investigates how participatory “ethnoecological” mapping of landscape resources contributes to “landscape ecological” patterns of diversity, how ecological diversity relates to ethnobotanical diversity, the structure and ecological status of cultural keystone species, and how ethnobotanical and ecological research findings can contribute to adaptive collaborative management.

Research advisor: Kimberly E. Medley, Ph.D., professor, Department of Geography, Miami University

Pio Saqui

University of Florida (Fla.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2009 – ‘12): Belize – Traditional Ecological Knowledge: A project to help revitalize Mopan Maya agricultural and ecological knowledge

Traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) of the Maya has been studied for its importance in human cultural survival worldwide. Pio’s research examines the ways in which the Maya culture and its traditions are transmitted through the use of “slash and burn” (Milpa) agriculture systems in order to maintain cultural practices. Through this project, Pio seeks to help revitalize traditional ecological knowledge in the Mopan Maya communities of Belize.

Research advisor: John Richard Stepp, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology and Latin American studies, University of Florida

Vivian Zeidemann

University of Florida (Fla.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2009 – ‘12): Brazil – Fostering sustainable forest-based livelihoods: the case of Brazil nut management

Traditional people in the Amazon are dependent on forest resources for their livelihoods, and the Brazil nut is the main forest species harvested. Vivian’s research examines the variation of Brazil nut quality, access, and ultimately income generation across the Riozinho do Anfrísio Extractive Reserve (RDAER) in Brazil.

Research advisor: Karen Kainer, Ph.D., associate professor of forest resources and conservation/Latin American studies, University of Florida

Alison Hale

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2010 – ‘11): Pennsylvania – Testing a novel mechanism of forest understory invasion by garlic mustard: short- and long-term impacts

In Pennsylvania’s forests, about 70 percent of all plants rely on a cooperative relationship with a unique group of fungi (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi) to obtain the nutrients they need to survive. Alison’s research examines how toxic chemicals produced by garlic mustard, a widespread invasive plant, disrupt this beneficial synergy and destabilize the health of our native forests.  

Olyssa Starry

University of Maryland (Md.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2010 – ‘11): Maryland – The role of green roof plants in urban storm water management

Green roofs offer an important solution to the problem of urban storm water management, retaining as much as 80 percent of rainwater they receive from small storms. However, not enough is known about how much water these structures retain under different environmental and planting scenarios. Through careful measurement of water in the substrate and plant, as well as changes in the condition of the plants, Olyssa’s research examines the role of three species of sedum in the rainwater retention of green roof systems.

Arika Virapongse

University of Florida (Fla.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2009 – ‘11): Brazil – Impact of market opportunities on livelihood strategies, decision-making and knowledge generation among burití palm leaf users

Arika’s research explores the factors that influence how different social groups participate in forest-product markets. Her case study is the handicraft market of buriti palm fiber artisans in the Maranhão state of Brazil. Better understanding of the relationship between local livelihoods and non-timber forest resources offers insights for improving the management and conservation of forests while respecting the roles and needs of the people who use them.

Rachel Meyer, Ph.D.

City University of New York/New York Botanical Garden (N.Y.), 2012

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2010): India and China –  History of eggplant domestication

Selena A. Ahmed, Ph.D.

City University of New York/New York Botanical Garden (N.Y.), 2011

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2008 – ‘10): China – Biodiversity of wild tea populations

Christopher Heckel, Ph.D. candidate

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2006 – ‘09): Western Pennsylvania – Effect of deer on Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)

Bianca Knoll, M.S.

University of California, Berkeley (Calif.), 2006

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2006 – ‘09): Costa Rica, Bolivia and Madagascar – Ferns which clean up arsenic pollution

Cassandra Quave, Ph.D.

Florida International University (Fla.), 2008

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2006 – ‘08): Italy – Antimicrobial plant extracts to combat drug-resistant staph

Nat Bletter, Ph.D.

City University of New York/New York Botanical Garden (N.Y.), 2006

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2003 – ‘07): Peru and Mali – Cross-cultural medical ethnobotany

Emily Mooney, Ph.D.

West Virginia University (W.Va.), 2007

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2004 – ‘06): Pennlyvania, New York, Maryland and West Virginia  – Ethnobiology of American ginseng (Panax quinquefolia)

John Paul, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.), 2008

Botany in Action-funded fieldwork (2003 – ‘06): Costa Rica – Causes of rarity in psychotria

Danica (Harbaugh) Reynaud, Ph.D.

University of California, Berkeley (Calif.), 2007

BIA-funded fieldwork (2003 – ‘06): Pacific and Australia – Ethnobotany of sandalwoods

Vicente Garcia, Ph.D.

University of California, Berkeley (Calif.), 2006

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2004 – ‘05): Pacific, Thailand and South East Asia – Biodiversity/ethnomedicine of Piper

Christiane Ehringhaus, Ph.D.

Yale University School of Forestry, 2005

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2003 – ‘05): Brazil – Non-timber forest products of the Amazon

Bruce Hoffman, Ph.D.

University of Hawaii (Hawaii), 2009

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2001 – ‘05): Suriname – Traditional plant knowledge of Amerindians and Maroons

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1995 – ‘97): Guyana  – Sustainable harvest of Heteropsis flexuosa

Sarah Khan, Ph.D.

City University of New York/New York Botanical Garden (N.Y.), 2006

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2002 – ‘05): India and China – Traditional anti-diabetic medicinal plants

Karen Crawley Kearney, Ph.D.

City University of New York/New York Botanical Garden (N.Y.), 2005

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1998 – 2005): Mexico – Traditional plant pharmacology of Quichol women

Adam Edwards, M.S.

Florida International University (Fla.), 2004

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2002 – ‘04): Southeastern North America – Caffeine content of Yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria)

Michael Gilmore, Ph.D.

Miami University (Ohio), 2004

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2001 – ’04): Peruvian Amazon – Maijuna ecology and ethnobotany

Alyssa Hanna

West Virginia University (W.Va.)

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2001 – ‘04): Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia – Impact of invasive species on American ginseng (Panax quinquefolia)

Anya Hinkle, Ph.D.

University of California, Berkeley (Calif.), 2005

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2001 – ‘04): French Polynesia – Dispersal of introduced medicinal plants

Rachel Collins, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.), 2003

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2000 – ‘03): West Virginia and Pennsylvania – Oak forest regeneration

Lauren Raz, Ph.D.

New York University/New York Botanical Garden (N.Y.), 2004

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2000 – ‘03): Cuba – West Indian dioscoreaceae, revision of rajania

Tiffany Knight, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.), 2002

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (2002): Western Pennsylvania – Deer herbivory impact on white trillium (Trillium grandiflorum)

Stefan Schnitzer, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh (Pa.), 2001

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1997 – 2001): Panama, Costa Rica and Pennsylvania – Treefall gaps’ role in forest regeneration and biodiversity maintenance

Darron Collins, Ph.D.

Tulane University (La.), 2001

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1998 – 2000): Guatemala – Ethnobotany of the Q’eqchi’

Sylvian G. Razafimandimbison, Ph.D.

Missouri Botanical Garden (Mo.), 2000

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1996 – ’97; 2000): Madagascar – Revision of rubiaceae

Kristine Stewart, Ph.D.

Florida International University (Fla.), 2000

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1997 – ‘99): Cameroon – Ethnobotany of red stinkwood (Prunus africana)

Dennis J. Milanowski, Ph.D.

Washington University (Mo.), 1998

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1996 – ‘98): Peru – Medicinal compounds of Croton section Cyclostigma

Armand Randrianasolo, Ph.D.

University of Missouri, Saint Louis/Missouri Botanical Garden (Mo.), 1998

Botany in Action funded fieldwork (1996 – ‘97): Madagascar – Rhus, micronychia, protorhus